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BIBLIOTECA VIRTUAL EXTREMEÑA

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miércoles, 1 de marzo de 2017

Emigrants and society. Extremadura and Spanish America in the sixteenth Century by Ida Altman






Altman, Ida (1989). EMIGRANTS AND SOCIETY. EXTREMADURA AND SPANISH AMERICA IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY Berkeley: University of California Press

The opening of the New World to Spanish settlement had more than the limited impact on individuals and society which scholars have traditionally granted it. Many families and young single people left the neighboring cities of Cáceres and Trujillo in the Extremadura region of southwestern Spain for the Indies. By maintaining ties with home and one another, and sometimes returning, these emigrants developed patterns of involvement that on one level were linked directly to place of origin and on another would come to characterize the emigration movement as a whole. Ida Altman shows that the Indies could and did have a substantial and perceptible effect on local society in Spain, as the New World quickly became an important arena of activity for people seeking new and better opportunities. Her findings suggest interesting conclusions regarding the relationship of sixteenth-century Spanish emigration to the larger movement of people from Europe to the Western Hemisphere in modern times.